The Who frontman Roger Daltrey supports Brexit.

Nine months after the British people voted to leave the European Union, today Prime Minister Theresa May officially invoked Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, which starts the clock on a two-year divorce proceeding.

In a referendum on June 23, 2016, the British electorate voted to leave or exit (i.e., Brexit) the EU by a vote of 52 percent to 48 percent, contrary to the predictions of the pollsters and London-centric media. Many in the U.K. entertainment industry backed the stay or Remain side.

Requiring complex negotiations, the split will eventually allow the U.K. to regain control and national sovereignty over its own laws governing immigration, trade, and many other functions.

Roger Daltrey, 73, told the NME website that he thinks Brexit is a good idea.

“We are getting out, and when the dust settles I think that it’ll be seen that it’s the right thing for this country to have done, that’s for sure. I am not anti European, but I an anti the present way we are being governed in Europe. It’s got nothing to do with any of the immigration issues or any of that for me. It was to do with much more. The majority of this country felt that their voices weren’t being heard. It would have been nice to do a deal with Europe but they didn’t want to do a deal, and they sent Cameron back with a bag…This country will always be alright, I don’t worry about it. You know it’s going to be bumpy on the way — we expected that; the ones that voted to get out…”

Commenting on the U.S. presidential election, Daltrey declared that “a dead dog” would have defeated Clinton because of her lack of appeal in Middle America. He also insisted that Trump needs a haircut “and as my mother would say, ‘wash your f*****g mouth out.’”

[Image by Robert E. Klein/AP Images]

In May 2016, Daltey told The Sun of London that the EU was “set up by a bunch of crooks,” and suggested that no one voting for it originally in the 1975 referendum expected the EU to expand beyond a trade deal or common market into a Brussels-based governing body that superseded British law. He described the EU as “undemocratic” and “highly dysfunctional.”

As the Inquisitr reported in November 2013, Roger Daltrey apparently “won’t get fooled again” by the U.K. Labor Party. A former Labor Party supporter, he registered his disapproval during an interview with the London Telegraph of mass immigration that occurred under the Labor Party-controlled government that, in his view, destroyed the jobs of many of his friends.

[Image by Reed Saxon/AP Images]

The Who lead singer grew up in a working class neighborhood in London.

Earlier this week, Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols similarly expressed support for Brexit in an appearance on the Good Morning Britain TV show hosted by Susanna Reed and outspoken Trump fan Piers Morgan, the winner of the 2008 Celebrity Apprentice.

“The working class has spoke, and I’m one of them, and I’m with them.”

Rotten (John Lydon) praised longtime Brexit champion Nigel Farage, the ex-leader of the UK Independence Party and the man most responsible for compelling then-Prime Minister David Cameron into authorizing the EU in-or-out referendum. See clip below.

When asked about President Trump, Rotten seemed to identify with his anti-establishment persona of the “complicated fellow” and “a possible friend.”

“What I dislike is the left-wing media in America are trying to smear the bloke as a racist, and that’s completely not true. There are many, many problems with him as a human being but he’s not that, and there just might be a chance something good will come out of this situation because he terrifies politicians. This is a joy to behold to me.”

Consistent with his populist platform, President Trump is and was a strong supporter of Brexit.

[Featured Image by Louisa Buller/AP Images]